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Landfall2004

GARDEN TIME!!!!!

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by on 02-10-2014 at 04:10 PM (3559 Views)
OK Mark, you did it. You started talking about plantin' taters. Today, the Grandkids and I are gonna start my mini-garden.

Since we don't have Aqua or Jericho Station this year, I submit this as our Official 2014 Gardening Blog.

It all started when my 2 stands of bamboo died. Evidently, there are some species of bamboo that live for 60-70 years, flower, go to seed, and die. And they drop like thousands of seeds. Well, Round-up on the seedlings took care of that problem, but not all the towering, dead bamboo. Had friends come in and cut some to make tiki huts, but barely made a dent in it. Finally hired a professional tree service and had it cut and mulched and stump-ground.

So, now I have this huge gap in my back yard, and an equally huge pile of bamboo mulch. And--some DAYLIGHT! So, over by the fence I found a patch of dirt that gets sun about 6 hrs. a day--maybe more as the sun works its way north. Got some old horse manure we had stock-piled and had my other half till it in and VOILA, instant garden.

So, the 7 and 2 year old and I set about planting it. Mostly plants, b/c I am impatient, but we did plant Kentucky Wonder Pole Beans (on the fence line), and Spinach seeds. So now we have tomatoes, peppers, eggplant and collards out of the ground, and waiting on the rest.

So, we decided to water-in our masterpiece. Pulled out the old kinked hose on that side of the house, turned it on, and gave a gentle tug to straighten it out. SNAP. Instant geyser. It was the hit of the day with the little ones. Broke the whole faucet off to the ground!!! So, I run to the house (remember, children are fenced IN), grab a portable phone and call my other half who comes home and saves the day by shutting off the pump and repairing the damage. It must have dug a 1 foot hole--it is a 4" well. Finally watered everything in--now we just gotta WAIT!!!! Maybe I'll have some collards and beans in time for Easter, huh?

So, that's my story, so far............

UPDATE: Better late than never! Here is the Spring/Summer 2014 Garden, in time progression.















FALL UPDATE





Notice the 5 ft. eggplant from last season, the tiny radishes, and the little collards. The carrots have started to come up, but not the spinach or onions. Maybe I planted too deep. I may have to get more seeds this weekend--except the garden stuff is in exile at Walmart already and Christmas has taken over the Garden Department.

Winter Update February 2015









As you can see, we made it thru the cold weather with no damage. There are now 3-4 more large eggplant coming along. The collards are filling out well again, just in time for some more ham, collard & black-eyed pea soup, before it gets too warm. The grape tomatoes are growing like, well, grapes, and I picked a pint yesterday. I pulled up the scraggly radishes--my fault, I planted them way too close. And the spinach bombed out again. In a week or two, I am going to replant spinach seeds. As I recall, the soil has to be 65 degrees for seeds to germinate.

ALRIGHTY THEN---I nveer knew this!!!

http://www.organicfoodee.com/inspira...ghtshadefoods/

Nightshade Foods

by Craig Sams

In the diet of Europe and Asia, only one nightshade food was eaten until recent times: the aubergine or eggplant. Other nightshades such as henbane, thorn apple (datura stramonium), belladonna and mandrake were well known but their use was restricted to specific medical applications (sedative, anesthetic or poison) or in witchcraft.
Then, in the 1600s and 1700s food and drug crops based on nightshades were imported from the Americas and for the past 400 years have penetrated and become ubiquitous in the Western diet. These include tobacco, tomatoes, potatoes and chili peppers. It is not surprising that these novel foods, being nightshades, were regarded with suspicion at first and were slow to take hold in the European diet. They all contain nicotine in some form, although it may be named solanine (potatoes), tomatine (tomatoes), alpha-solanine (aubergine) or solanadine (chillies and capsicums).

It is now apparent that there are groups of people who cannot tolerate nightshades in their diets, wish to avoid them anyway or find that eliminating them helps alleviate a variety of mental, emotional and physical problems. The following groups of people avoid nightshades.

People with arthritis – Some researchers believe that arthritis is misdiagnosed in people who are in fact just suffering joint aches and swelling arising from consumption of nightshades. One in three arthritics react badly to nightshades. These individuals frequently have a sensitivity to the solanine chemicals present in these foods. It can take up to six months of exclusion of nightshades from the diet to achieve a beneficial effect.

Macrobiotics – since the 1960s, the macrobiotic diet has recommended avoidance of all nightshades. This proven diet for health and longevity is followed by celebrities such as Sadie Frost, Gwyneth Paltrow, Chris Martin of Coldplay and Madonna.

Children with eczema – for some children the elimination of nightshades from the diet helps clear eczema, particularly around the mouth.

Gastro Esophogal Reflux disease – consumption of nightshade vegetables, particularly tomatoes, can causes a reaction where the stomach contents are pushed back up the esophagus towards the throat with symptoms of heartburn, chest pain, choking while lying down and asthma symptoms when sleeping.

Those quitting smoking – some programmes to help people give up cigarettes also recommend giving up nightshade foods in order to completely eliminate low level nicotine intake and consequent re-addiction.

Blood group diet – Dr. Peter d’Adamo’s Blood Type Diet recommends people of blood types A and B to avoid all nightshade foods. This represents about half the population of most European countries.

Cystitis, lupus, psoriasis – giving up nightshades can help relieve symptoms of cystitis, lupus and psoriasis.

What are the Nightshade foods? How do they differ from each other? What are their origins?

Tobacco
The most powerful source of the nicotine alkaloid found in all nightshades became a popular drug in the early part of the 1900s, when mass produced cigarettes made them available to the expanding urban societies. Although the nicotine content of tobacco is much higher than that found in nightshade vegetables which are eaten, the practise of smoking reduces the amount of nicotine absorbed. The nicotine in a single cigarette, if taken direct into the bloodstream, would be fatal. Eating a single cigarette could cause severe illness. There are several instances of livestock poisoning where cattle or sheep have eaten nightshade plant leaves.

Tomatoes
Tomatoes were first brought to Europe from Mexico by Cortez and were first cultivated for food in Naples. The English regarded them as poisonous until the 1700s. They were introduced in America as an ornamental garden plant in 1808, but were not eaten as they were believed to cause stomach cancer and appendicitis. The botanical name for tomatoes ‘Lycopersicon’ means ‘wolf peach’ and refers to the association between werewolves, witchcraft and nightshades. Then, in 1820, Colonel Robert Johnson defied the advice of his physicians (“You will foam and froth at the mouth and double over”) and ate tomatoes on the steps of Salem Courthouse, New Jersey, in front of a crowd of 2000 witnesses, the local sheriff waiting to arrest him for suicide. He survived and people began slowly to accept tomatoes as food. In the US and Northern Europe they really took off as food with the introduction of canning and canned soups and then rose again with the expansion of consumption of pizza and pasta in the past 30 years.

Potatoes
Potatoes were elevated in status when the celebrated Parmentier produced a galaxy of delicious potato recipes in 1785 to help relieve famine in Paris. Potatoes were cheap food for the masses – a peasant or worker could be fed from a quarter as much land if they ate potatoes instead of grain. Nonetheless, the French Revolution took place 4 years later. The Paris Commune declared potatoes ‘Revolutionary food’ while English landlords made them compulsory on their Irish estates.

Traditionally potatoes were kept in paper sacks and sold unwashed. This practice protected them from direct sunlight. The modern practice of washing potatoes and packing them in plastic bags allows light to affect the potato and stimulate its production of solanine, the nightshade alkaloid that, in nature, sickens animals that might dig up potatoes for food. In 1976 the Department of Health, concerned about high levels of anencephaly and spina bifida, urged pregnant mothers to wear rubber gloves when preparing potatoes and to discard in their entirety any potatoes that showed signs of greening or of blight (black streaks in the potato). It is not enough to simply remove the discoloured part – the entire potato should not be eaten. The solanine in potatoes is 4 times greater in the skin than in the rest of the potato. The fatal dose of solanine for an adult is 200-250 mg depending on body weight. Potatoes should not contain more than 20 mg of solanine per 100g, so it would take at least 1 Kg of potatoes (2.2 lbs) to be fatal. Potato peels have been found to contain up to 180 mg of solanine per 100g, so a person consuming 150-200g of deep fried potato peels with a high solanine content could be at considerable risk. Potatoes that have been properly stored and are from low solanine varieties will only contain 7 mg/100g. In 1996 the Committee on Toxicity stated that potatoes should not be eaten if they still taste bitter after the green parts and sprouts have been removed. However, few people taste-test a raw potato once it is peeled to assess its bitterness. Although spina bifida prevention now focuses on preconceptual consumption of folic acid, the world’s highest incidence of spina bifida is in Ireland, where the wet climate encourages late potato blight. A study in Belfast showed that mothers who had given birth to a child with spina bifida or anencephaly could reduce the risk of a similar defect in the second child by 50% if they maintained a potato-free diet.

Peppers and capsicums
Peppers and capsicums were rare in the Western diet until the 1980s, when they became widely available as fresh vegetables and, in their hotter forms, in Asian cuisine and as hot sauce. Chillis replaced peppercorns in Indian cuisine from the 1650s onwards, after Portuguese traders brought plants and seeds from Brazil. Hot peppers are rich in capsaicin, which creates a burning sensation that affects pain receptor cells and causes them to release endorphins, the body’s natural opiate-like painkillers, that create a temporary feeling of euphoria. Peppers and capsicums also contain solanine and solanadine, the nicotine compounds that are unique to nightshade plants.

Aubergines
Aubergines or eggplants most resemble in appearance the belladonna nightshade plant that may be their wild ancestor.
So what is nicotine (solanine), the active alkaloid in nightshades? What are its effects? Nicotine acts as an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor.
What are acetylcholinesterase inhibitors?
The chemical that transmits nerve impulses from one nerve ending to the next is acetylcholine – once it has transmitted a nerve impulse it has done its job and is no longer needed so it is broken down by an enzyme called acetylcholinesterase and recycled.

Nictotine/Solanine (or tomatine from tomatoes) slows the production of this acetylcholinesterase, so acetylcholine isn’t broken down as fast as it’s being produced.

Acetylcholine builds up causing a ‘traffic jam’ of stimulation at the receptor nerve endings. Or think of an orchestra where notes are played and then don’t stop playing.

The nerve endings become overstimulated. At low levels this is mildly pleasurable and blurs sensitivity, but too much can be harmful.
This overstimulation can lead to muscle weakness, muscle twitching, hypertension, increased intestinal contractions and increased secretions of tear, sweat, saliva, gastric and intestinal glands.

All nightshade foods contain solanine, a strong acetylcholinesterase inhibitor. This is what makes excessive consumption of nightshade foods unsuitable for many people.

Certain pesticides, particularly organophosphate and carbamates, also work as acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, achieving the same effect as solanine or nicotine. That’s why they replaced nicotine as the insecticide of choice after World War 2, when organophosphates were used as nerve gas.

For a diet that seeks to maintain a strong and healthy nervous and neuromuscular system there is considerable evidence that the safest approach is to avoid nightshade vegetables and to eat food that is grown without the use of carbamate or organophosphate pesticides, i.e. organic food. Before the discovery of chemical pesticides, nicotine was a widely used insecticide. It kills insects in the same way, but chemical sprays are cheaper and longer-lasting. Until they were replaced by hormones and antibiotics, organophosphate pesticides were also used by livestock farmers as growth-promoters – the mechanism whereby they cause muscle weakness and increase secretions of digestive fluids also causes animals to exercise less and eat more, thereby fattening them up more quickly.

Why do people love nightshades?

What is it that makes tobacco so addictive? Why is it that sometimes only chips will do, or we are gagging for a pizza? Nicotine, in small quantities, by inhibiting the breakdown of acetylcholine, stimulates increased activity of the acetylcholine receptors in the brain and this leads to increased flow of adrenaline. This increases the heart rate, blood pressure and leads to increased blood glucose levels. This mild increase in energy level is achieved, along with a reduced nervous sensitivity; producing a combination of calmness and stimulation. This provides short term relief in the face of the stresses and pressures of modern life. In the longer term it puts a strain on the nervous system as the receptors are being overstimulated.

Why don’t we eat tobacco?

The leaves of all nightshades contain high levels of nicotine. One could, at a pinch, smoke potato or tomato leaves. A potent insecticide can be made with tomato leaves. The levels of nicotine in the leaves of nightshade plants are much higher than in nightshade fruits or tubers. 8-10 cigarettes, if eaten, would be enough to kill a person. First time smokers experience dreadful nausea but gradually develop a resistance to the effects of nicotine and this is how addiction develops – more and more is needed to satisfy the craving.

Why are nightshades legal?

If the nightshade foods were to be introduced to the Western diet today, under current Novel Foods regulations they would have to be tested for safety. It is unlikely that they would be permitted to enter the food supply, solely because of their nicotine (solanine) content. However, like cigarettes, they slipped into our diet despite some voices in opposition and have assumed a major role in our nutrition and health, a role that, in a free society, should be accepted.

However, moderation in all things is a worthy principle and it could be argued that, in our diet we have perhaps gone too far down the road of nightshade acceptance.

So how can i enjoy a nice bit of ketchup?!

There’s a fantastic tasting range of nightshade-free organic foods called Nomato. They’re from the same guys that brought us Green & Black’s chocolate, so you can imagine they taste amazing. There’s Nomato pasta sauce, Nomato ketchup, Nomato soup, and Nomato veggie chili beans. So you can have a bit of what you fancy without the nicotine alkaloids found in tomatoes and other nightshades.
************************************************

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Updated 03-09-2015 at 06:20 PM by Landfall2004

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  1. libgoon's Avatar
    First !

    Good for you Landfall !

    I don't garden but enjoy reading about them !
  2. Landfall2004's Avatar
    RE PORTED Lib!!! I hope we can all have fun with this while we wait for The Season.
  3. McBart ender's Avatar
    Scotts Bonus-S went down this weekend. Waiting for the rain to water it into the soil. Pressure washed the sidewalks and porch. Cleaned out the fountain, and trimmed the Ivy. ...All part of my pre-spring rituals.

    I don't care what the pukes-on-tony rodent or the calender says, My garden is budding out like crazy. The garden says it's spring. I wonder what the old timers would say that foretells about 'the season'.
  4. Landfall2004's Avatar
    Yeah, I'm gonna have to spray for weeds AGAIN.

    My Dad, an "agronomist in the field of ornamental horticulture"--or "poor dirt farmer" as he used to call himself, grew Chrysanthemums. He always said to beware of the late March freeze, so I don't get too crazy with the hedges and trimming until Spring has sprung.

    My mini-garden will be small enough that I can easily protect it if need be.

    PS--Be careful with the Weed-n-Feed products. Don't get too near the root spread of your bushes or trees. Remember, the roots are out AT LEAST as far as the canopy.
  5. Landfall2004's Avatar
    Bonus S Southern Weed & Feed is a combination of lawn food and a weed killer called atrazine. Atrazine is a selective herbicide that interferes with energy production in plants. Because it is mostly absorbed by the roots, it can harm trees and shrubs. We recommend that you avoid applying this product under the dripline of trees or shrubs. You should also keep it two feet away from ornamental plantings and mulched beds.
    1 year ago
    ScottsCustomerCare
    Marysville, OH, USA
  6. Landfall2004's Avatar
    Only because I have a Lychee tree and argue with my husband about this every year:


    Fertilizing Lychee trees

    Once trees are 4 or more years old and begin fruit production, applications of nitrogen containing fertilizer from August until early spring (February-March) should be avoided. Nitrogen applications during this time may stimulate new vegetative growth (i.e., leaves and shoots) and reduce or eliminated the potential for flowering and fruit production.
    Updated 02-10-2014 at 08:47 PM by Landfall2004
  7. McBart ender's Avatar
    Thanks LF! All good info. I've applied Bonus-S to this yard several seasons now, and have had no problems with the existing shrubs and trees. It does a great job on chick-weed, dollar weed, and even crabgrass; ...and by April I've got the greenest healthiest thickest lawn on the block. I'm the corner house so it's important to me.

    Bonus-S has continued to have major price increases every year. It's over $40 now at Lowes. I've considered using a multitude of several other products combined to get the same or similar effect at a lower price. I just don't trust myself to get it right. This stuff is almost fool proof, and I'm no green thumb by any stretch of the imagination.

    I don't have to worry about nitrogen on my fruit trees because well, I don't have any.
  8. Landfall2004's Avatar
    Yeah, we use Scott's because of the performance, and a friend of ours in professional golf club maint. says Scott's is "idiot proof"...it is hard to screw up. However, over time, you may see some decline in your shrubs. Be careful.
  9. SuperYooper's Avatar
    I'll make sure to post pictures of our garden.

    IN JUNE.

    Damn warm weather people.
  10. Landfall2004's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by SuperYooper
    I'll make sure to post pictures of our garden.

    IN JUNE.

    Damn warm weather people.
    Mine will be dead by then -- BUT I plan on trying CORN!!! Maybe some okra and/or blackeyes, too.
  11. NavarreMark's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by Landfall2004
    Mine will be dead by then -- BUT I plan on trying CORN!!! Maybe some okra and/or blackeyes, too.
    I wouldn't wait til June to plant corn anywhere in FL. I try to get mine in before the end of March. I had success last year using Early Sunglow Hybrid. It has huge suckers, but the experts I spoke with said not to trim them, just let them be and it worked. One of my neighbors planted altenating plants of Early Sunglow Hybrid and Silver Queen. So he had a hybrid of a hybrid. Came out with bigger cobs than the sunglow I grew and it had alternating white and yellow kernals. LOL, but it was very good.
  12. NavarreMark's Avatar
    "OK Mark, you did it. You started talking about plantin' taters."

    Although I can't claim firsties, I claim credit for the inspiration.

    Mama said that she planted 20 seed potatoes of the normal Idaho type potatoes and 20 seed potatoes of Red Russets. Had real good success with the Idaho type last year. Haven't tried the Red Russets in FL before. Will be interesting to see how they work.

    In our part of FL its a good time to get your tomatoes started too. Gets to hot in summer. I've learned that it has to get below 74 at night for tomatoes to bear fruit. It won't be to many more months before its only getting down to 78-80 at night. Have to wait until fall when that happens.
  13. Landfall2004's Avatar
    Intro updated, for those interested.

    PS Interesting info about tomatoes, Mark. I never knew that!!!!!!
  14. libgoon's Avatar
    Just to let you know Read it

    You and the grandkids gardening
  15. FtMyersgal's Avatar
    How early can I plant tomato and green peppers this far south?
  16. Landfall2004's Avatar
    FMG--try this link to UFL. It is the Fla. Vegetable Gardening Guide.

    SP 103/VH021: Florida Vegetable Gardening Guide
  17. Landfall2004's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by NavarreMark
    "OK Mark, you did it. You started talking about plantin' taters."

    Although I can't claim firsties, I claim credit for the inspiration.

    Mama said that she planted 20 seed potatoes of the normal Idaho type potatoes and 20 seed potatoes of Red Russets. Had real good success with the Idaho type last year. Haven't tried the Red Russets in FL before. Will be interesting to see how they work.

    In our part of FL its a good time to get your tomatoes started too. Gets to hot in summer. I've learned that it has to get below 74 at night for tomatoes to bear fruit. It won't be to many more months before its only getting down to 78-80 at night. Have to wait until fall when that happens.
    Hey Mark, do you just take a tater and cut sections that have "eyes" and plant 'em? My Dad had sweet taters like 20 years ago--tons of 'em, way down here in S FL. I may have to experiment with my new-found sun.

    Oh, and Good Morning, All. See Ais slept in and/or has no power to make breakfast.
  18. FtMyersgal's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by Landfall2004
    FMG--try this link to UFL. It is the Fla. Vegetable Gardening Guide.

    SP 103/VH021: Florida Vegetable Gardening Guide
    Thanks LF! Looks like I'll try April for the spring garden

  19. spathy's Avatar
    Did someone say garden blog?
  20. Landfall2004's Avatar
    Yeah Spathy, I'm tryin'!!!!!!

    I will post some pics of my little garden when the sprouts get big enough to see!!!!!!! The pole beans are coming along and I think I see some spinach. I put in some sorry looking 3" pots of Lacinato Kale for my daughter and then decided to put in some seeds for little green onions. My mini-garden is packing maximum density, especially when the collards and spinach and kale all grow!!!

    Thanks for stopping by. Look forward to reading about your garden trials and tribulations and successes!!!!
  21. McBart ender's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by spathy
    Did someone say garden blog?
    How's the parrot? Still demanding fresh fruit while you garden?
  22. Landfall2004's Avatar
    Oh, forgot to tell you. My better half went to test the sprinklers and be sure they were hitting the garden on Sunday. Somewhere between the great geyser of last week, and after using the hose Thurs. PM, the pump broke!!!! My yard is very thirsty. I had a city water faucet I could hook 3 hoses to and reach the garden, so my babies are OK--but the rest of the yard sure is dry. No water since last Thursday AM. A part is on the way for the control box. Trying the least expensive fix first. If it is not that, it may be the submersible pump. Not good.
  23. McBart ender's Avatar
    A down-hole pump... hmmm Sounds expensive...

    Is hubby troubleshooting this or do you have a service guy looking at it?
  24. Landfall2004's Avatar
    This is bigger than us. My childhood friend is in the biz.

    It's a 4" well--75% of 2.5 acres is sprinkled.
  25. McBart ender's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by Landfall2004
    This is bigger than us. My childhood friend is in the biz.

    It's a 4" well--75% of 2.5 acres is sprinkled.

    "Impressive!" D. Vadar -1776
  26. Landfall2004's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by McBart ender
    "Impressive!" D. Vadar -1776
    "It's Good to be the King!"

    Mel Brooks, 1976
  27. Aislinn's Avatar
    Good morning, afternoon and evening, everyone. It's 64 degrees, 64 dew point, and 64 wind chill. It looks like it rained or is lightly raining, but not a drop to be seen on radar. High expected of 75.

    I have to dig out my amaryllis which is around 120 years old and transplant it this week. It was a gift when it was divided at a friends house several years ago. Time to divide and replant again. Now I need to move it to the new garden.

    Breakfast's on the sideboard: shrimp and spinach omelet, Eggs Benedict with asparagus and a creamy low fat shrimp sauce, scrambled eggs with ricotta and brocolini, eggs and hash browns, Apple Pie Breakfast Cakes, berry breakfast pizza, Cheesecake Burritos with strawberry topping, pancakes and maple syrup, thick slices of fried honey ham, cheese Danishes, yogurt, fresh fruit and orange, apple or pineapple juice. Regular and decaf coffee with flavored creamers to the side. Enjoy!
  28. libgoon's Avatar
    Cheese Danish please Ais !
  29. Landfall2004's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by Aislinn
    Good morning, afternoon and evening, everyone. It's 64 degrees, 64 dew point, and 64 wind chill. It looks like it rained or is lightly raining, but not a drop to be seen on radar. High expected of 75.

    I have to dig out my amaryllis which is around 120 years old and transplant it this week. It was a gift when it was divided at a friends house several years ago. Time to divide and replant again. Now I need to move it to the new garden.

    Breakfast's on the sideboard: shrimp and spinach omelet, Eggs Benedict with asparagus and a creamy low fat shrimp sauce, scrambled eggs with ricotta and brocolini, eggs and hash browns, Apple Pie Breakfast Cakes, berry breakfast pizza, Cheesecake Burritos with strawberry topping, pancakes and maple syrup, thick slices of fried honey ham, cheese Danishes, yogurt, fresh fruit and orange, apple or pineapple juice. Regular and decaf coffee with flavored creamers to the side. Enjoy!
    Ais-- please tell me more about amaryllis. I was given a load of them and my son's new house came with a whole clump of them. Bulbs are not my forte!
  30. spathy's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by McBart ender
    How's the parrot? Still demanding fresh fruit while you garden?
    Yup. The bird is my taste tester,pruner,and mascot.
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