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FLdewey

Colorado Wildfires

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by on 06-27-2012 at 04:22 PM (7752 Views)

A three-day-old wildfire erupted with catastrophic fury Tuesday, ripping across the foothills neighborhoods of Colorado Springs, devouring an untold number of homes and sending tens of thousands fleeing to safety in what was shaping up as one of the biggest disasters in state history. “This is a firestorm of epic proportions,” said Colorado Springs Fire Chief Richard Brown. The Waldo Canyon fire in El Paso County — which had been growing in the forested hills on the city’s west side — blew into an inferno late in the afternoon, raging over a ridge toward densely populated neighborhoods. An apocalyptic plume of smoke covered Colorado’s second-largest city as thousands of people forced to evacuate clogged Interstate 25 at rush hour trying to get to their homes or to get out of the way. By nightfall, roughly 32,000 people left their homes, chased out by the flames.





Waldo Fire


The Waldo Canyon fire burns an entire neighborhood in near the foothills of Colorado Springs, Colo. Tuesday, June 26, 2012. Colorado has endured nearly a week of 100-plus-degree days and low humidity, sapping moisture from timber and grass, creating a devastating formula for volatile wildfires across the state and punishing conditions for firefighters. (The Denver Post, Helen H. Richardson) #





Waldo Fire


The Waldo Canyon fire continues to burn northwest of Manitou Springs, Colo. Tuesday, June 26, 2012. Colorado has endured nearly a week of 100-plus-degree days and low humidity, sapping moisture from timber and grass, creating a devastating formula for volatile wildfires across the state and punishing conditions for firefighters. (The Denver Post) #





Waldo Fire


A neighborhood west of the intersections of Vindicator Drive, Centennial Blvd and Flying W Ranch Road burns near the foothills of Colorado Springs. The Waldo Canyon fire took a turn for the worse as the fire exploded and made a run northward taking homes and thousands of acres with today June 26th,2012. Helen H. Richardson, The Denver Post #





Waldo Fire


Firefighters get ready to head into neighborhoods which were caught by the Waldo Canyon Fire after it swept down into western portions of Colorado Springs, Colo. on Tuesday, June 26, 2012 leaving a trail of destruction, burning homes and buildings in its path. Heavily populated areas in the fire's path have been affected. (AP Photo/Bryan Oller) #





Waldo Fire


People flee the Waldo Canyon Fire with little time to spare as the fire burns through neighborhoods west of Colorado Springs, Colo. on Tuesday, June 26, 2012. The blaze left a trail of destruction, burning homes and buildings in it's path. Heavily populated areas in the fire's path have been affected. (AP Photo/Bryan Oller) #





Waldo Fire


The skies are orange as flames from the Waldo Canyon Fire race through a neighborhood in west Colorado Springs, Colo. on Tuesday, June 26, 2012 leaving a trail of destruction, burning homes and buildings in its path. Heavily populated areas in the fire's path have been affected. (AP Photo/Bryan Oller) #





Waldo Fire


The Waldo Canyon fire burns an entire neighborhood in near the foothills of Colorado Springs, Colo. Tuesday, June 26, 2012. Colorado has endured nearly a week of 100-plus-degree days and low humidity, sapping moisture from timber and grass, creating a devastating formula for volatile wildfires across the state and punishing conditions for firefighters. (The Denver Post, Helen H. Richardson) #





Waldo Fire


Fire from the Waldo Canyon wildfire burns as it moved into subdivisions and destroyed homes in Colorado Springs, Colo., on Tuesday, June 26, 2012. (AP Photo/Gaylon Wampler) #





Waldo Fire


The Waldo Canyon fire burns an entire neighborhood in near the foothills of Colorado Springs, Colo. Tuesday, June 26, 2012. Colorado has endured nearly a week of 100-plus-degree days and low humidity, sapping moisture from timber and grass, creating a devastating formula for volatile wildfires across the state and punishing conditions for firefighters. (The Denver Post, Helen H. Richardson) #





Waldo Fire


The Waldo Canyon fire burns homes near Colorado Springs, Colo. Tuesday, June 26, 2012. Colorado has endured nearly a week of 100-plus-degree days and low humidity, sapping moisture from timber and grass, creating a devastating formula for volatile wildfires across the state and punishing conditions for firefighters. (The Denver Post, Helen H. Richardson) #





Waldo Fire

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Comments

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  1. FLdewey's Avatar
    One big problem is that wildland fire fighting has become TOO good. Places that normally would burn every 3-5 years now go decades without a major fire. I mean that's besides the obvious that global warming is to blame of course.

  2. NavarreMark's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by FLdewey
    One big problem is that wildland fire fighting has become TOO good. Places that normally would burn every 3-5 years now go decades without a major fire. I mean that's besides the obvious that global warming is to blame of course.

    Yep.

    I'm a firm believer in controlled burns. They don't do enough of them. Been tryin to get the county to do one in the woods behind my house for years now with no luck. Dead trees been piling up there from Ivan, Dennis, Katrina etc... Not to mention the normal jungle like growth.

    They'll get to it when it starts on fire in an uncontrolled fashion.
  3. FtMyersgal's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by FLdewey
    One big problem is that wildland fire fighting has become TOO good. Places that normally would burn every 3-5 years now go decades without a major fire. I mean that's besides the obvious that global warming is to blame of course.

    Global warming is responsible for all the problems of our world (GW and Al Gore that is)
  4. SQUAWK's Avatar
    This is from NASA's Earth Observatory. I thought I had read that some pines need fire to release their seeds. It is true. These forests require fire to regenerate.

    Although most people regard fire as a destructive force that should be fought and quickly extinguished, the fact is the boreal forest evolved in the presence of fire and adapted to it. Forrest Hall says it’s not a question of if a given region of the boreal forest will burn, it’s a question of when. Hall, a physicist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, explains that wildfire is an integral part of the boreal ecosystem. Indeed, the high northern latitude forests would be quite different were it not for frequent fires (Hall 1999).

    "Fire is the mechanism by which the forest is continually regenerated," states Hall. Fires consume dead, decaying vegetation accumulating on the forest floor, thereby clearing the way for new growth. Some species, such as the jack pine, even rely on fire to spread their seeds. The jack pine produces "seratonous" (resin-filled) cones that are very durable. The cones remain dormant until a fire occurs and melts the resin. Then the cones pop open and the seeds fall or blow out.


    LINK
  5. libgoon's Avatar
    Good piece SQUAWK ..
  6. FtMyersgal's Avatar
    Nice article Squawk. I remember the Yellowstone fire years back. They claim part of the reason it was so devastating was we didn't let the forest burn naturally and the vegatation got too dense. Fire is natures way of maintaining a health eco system. Trouble is when it gets out of control like the current situation in Colorado
  7. PcolaDan's Avatar
  8. FLdewey's Avatar
    Okay dan... that takes the term "screen shot" to a whole new level.
  9. emcf30's Avatar
    Waldo Canyon Wildfire fire perimeter timeline 24-27 June 2012.

  10. PcolaDan's Avatar
    Johnson Space Center ‏@NASA_Johnson
    Video camera on International Space Station captures footage of Colorado wildfires: Wildfires Seen From Station - YouTube
  11. PcolaDan's Avatar
  12. CRepp28's Avatar
  13. FLdewey's Avatar
    Wow... that's crazy.
  14. kaiden's Avatar
    That is a sad picture CRepp.
  15. beell's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by PcolaDan
    No doubt, the most destructive fire in Colorado history since they built those 340 something homes in the foothills where the wilderness meets the urban sprawl...
  16. libgoon's Avatar
    CR thanks for sharing....Puts my moaning in perspective....The second photo is horrific .

    Dan those videos are great ...but horrible
  17. sangria's Avatar
    Pine Ridge fire, north of Grand Junction was headed toward I-70 last night...

    UPDATE: Evacuations ordered in De Beque, I-70 E of Palisade Closed | News - Home

    Also...don't know if this has been posted....this is the incident page, with all updates, maps, etc....for each of the fires...
    InciWeb the Incident Information System: Current Incidents

    Updated 06-29-2012 at 01:21 PM by sangria
  18. emcf30's Avatar
    Lightning strikes in Aspen Colorado

    CRAZY lightning storm rolled through aspen colorado this evening 6/28/12. shot a timelapse of it barreling into town. almost every frame i took has flashes of lightning. this is two frames combined into one (the images were about 45 seconds apart).

    ( Credit ) Thomas O'brien / tmophoto

  19. sangria's Avatar
  20. sangria's Avatar
    The Colorado Springs Fire Department recorded this video to show just what it looked like when the Waldo Canyon Fire devoured the Mountain Shadows subdivision.


  21. PcolaDan's Avatar
    San, I have seen my fair share of disaster areas, but something like this, I can't even begin to imagine. The terror of people who wake up one morning to find that their safe haven, their home, their sanctuary, their memories, which were safe just last night, have to be abandoned IMMEDIATELY. Even if you think it's going to come your way, the horror of seeing it on the horizon...
  22. FtMyersgal's Avatar
    Folks, those are some amazing photos and videos. I just can't begin to imagine what those people went through, and are still going through!
  23. sangria's Avatar
    Dan, I have never been to a disaster area, but that video is powerful!! I cannot begin to imagine the incredible sense of fear that the people near those fires felt.
  24. FLdewey's Avatar
    Wow... fantastic video.
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